• State-wide Tornado Warning Test Scheduled for Wednesday
    P { margin-bottom: 0.08in; }JAMESTOWN - The week of April 24th has been designated, “Severe Summer Weather Awareness Week,” for the entire state of North Dakota.  This annual event is designed to remind the public of the dangers associated with severe summer weather including:  lightning, high winds, large hail, flash floods and tornadoes...
  • UPDATE: Fiber Optic Cable Cut Between Jamestown and Valley City
     VALLEY CITY/JAMESTOWN - CenturyLink has confirmed a third-party contractor damaged a fiber optic cable between Jamestown and Valley City Friday afternoon...
  • ND Highway 20 Project at Jamestown to Begin on Tuesday
     JAMESTOWN – The North Dakota Department of Transportation announced Friday that Construction will begin Tuesday, April 25 on ND Highway 20 from Jamestown north to ND Highway 9...
  • New Convicted High Risk Sex Offender Living in Jamestown
    Geoffrey Owen Lynch JAMESTOWN - Jamestown Police are warning residents of a convicted high risk sex offender who has moved into the city.Geoffrey Owen Lynch is living at 517 4th Street NW.  He drives a black 1985 Chevy 1/2 ton truck with North Dakota license plate JES357.  Lynch is currently on probation and on GPS monitoring. Lynch is a 42-year-old white male standing 5 feet 8 inches, weighing 205 pounds, with green eyes and brown hair.  His file photo shows him with a receded hairline and a large beard. Lynch was convicted in February 2001 in Rolette County Distric Court, ND of Gross Sexual Imposition after he provided alcohol to three minor and had intercourse with a 15-year-old girl while she was asleep.  He was convicted in January 2016 in McLean County District Court, ND of Sexual Imposition.  While camping with his family, Lynch entered a neighboring tent where he fondled and had intercourse with a female victim despite her repeated demands for him to stop. Jamestown Police Chief Scott Edinger cautions residents that any attempts to harass, intimidate or threaten Lynch, his family, employer or landlord, will be turned over for prosecution.  Printed handouts of Lynch's demographics are available from the Jamestown Police Department.
  • High Risk Sex Offender has Changed Addresses
     Kyle Greenough JAMESTOWN - Jamestown Police are warning residents of a convicted high risk sex offender who has changed his address in the city.Kyle Greenough is now living at 102 4th Avenue SW...
  • Governor Seeking Members for Ballot Measure Study Commission
     BISMARCK, N.D. (Mike Nowatzki) – Gov. Doug Burgum has signed Senate Bill 2135 and is now seeking applicants for the Initiated and Referred Measure Study Commission created by the legislation. During the 2017-2018 interim, the commission will study the process and cost of placing initiated and referred measures on the ballot in North Dakota and campaigning for or against such ballot measures. Members also will study the process used to place measures on the ballot in other states; whether the North Dakota Constitution or state law relating to initiated or referred measures should be amended; and the effects of out-of-state funding on the process and whether limits on such funding are necessary. The commission will meet at least four times and must report its findings and any recommendations to Legislative Management by Sept. 1, 2018. The 19-member commission will include seven citizen members appointed by the governor, one of whom must be a member of an association that represents employees and their interests. Those interested in serving on the commission may fill out an online application form at www.governor.nd.gov/boards/AppForm.aspx. The application deadline is May 19. A copy of SB 2135 can be found at www.legis.nd.gov/assembly/65-2017/documents/17-0399-10000.pdf. The act is effective through June 30, 2019. 
  • United Tribes Technical College Will Continue Tuition Waver Program
     BISMARCK (UTN) – United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) has renewed its Native American Tuition Waiver program for the 2017-2018 academic year. The program was launched last year on a trial basis for students who are enrolled members of federally-recognized tribes. In a press release, UTTC President Leander McDonald says that the school 's goal is to help make higher education attainable for people with some of the lowest annual income averages in the entire nation. McDonald says the move was aimed at helping students avoid relying exclusively on student loans...
  • Brochure Helps Parents Decide if Children are Ready to Stay Alone
     BISMARCK, N.D. (LuWanna Lawrence) – Parents and caregivers are busy planning their children’s summertime activities and making child care decisions. During this process, many questions may arise about whether or not their children are ready to stay home alone or babysit siblings or neighbor children. To help parents and caregivers with their decision, the North Dakota Department of Human Services’ Children and Family Services Division and Prevent Child Abuse North Dakota have created an informational brochure called “Home Alone: Is Your Child Ready?” that provides guidance and answers some of the most common child supervision questions. The brochure is online at www.nd.gov/dhs/info/pubs/family.html. “This time of the year, the department receives numerous calls from parents with questions about leaving their children home alone, and parents need to know that North Dakota does not have a state law that dictates a specific age when a child can stay home alone,” said Marlys Baker, child protection services administrator for the department. “Children mature at different rates, and age is not the only factor parents need to weigh when making their decision.” Baker said the brochure outlines several of these factors parents should consider when making child supervision decisions including age, emotional well-being and maturity, length of time their child would be alone along with the time of day or night, their child’s physical or mental limitations, and the accessibility of a parent or other adults. Home Alone: Is Your Child Ready? also touches on other factors to consider regarding self-care, home safety strategies, and other tips that can help make staying home alone a positive experience for both children and parents. “The brochure provides parents and caregivers with guidelines, so they can take the appropriate steps to safeguard their children this summer and throughout the year,” said Sandy Tibke, executive director of Prevent Child Abuse North Dakota. “It’s a must-read for parents and caregivers as they decide whether self-care is appropriate for their children.” Parents and caregivers can learn about other parenting resources at www.pcand.org or by calling Prevent Child Abuse North Dakota at 701-223-9052 or toll-free at 800-403-9932. The Department of Human Services’ Children and Family Services Division, Prevent Child Abuse North Dakota, the North Dakota State University Extension Service – Parent Education Network, and other public and private partners work to strengthen families and promote child well-being.
  • State Lawmakers Pass DOT Budget that Closes Maintenance Shops
     BISMARCK - North Dakota lawmakers have approved the state's Department of Transportation budget that includes the closure of eight maintenance shops.Language worked out in conference committee allows DOT maintenance shops in Courtenay, Fessenden, Finley, Gackle, Litchville, Mayville and New England to be leased to local governments in lieu of being closed...
  • Four Nebraska Liquor Stores on SD Border Lose Licenses
    LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) - Four Nebraska stores known for selling millions of cans of beer each year near a South Dakota Indian reservation have lost their liquor licenses.The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission's ruling on Wednesday could force an end to beer sales in Whiteclay, a town with just nine residents on the border of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. State regulators reviewed the stores' licenses amid complaints that the town lacks adequate law enforcement to address frequent violence, drunken driving and other crimes. The stores have operated in Whiteclay for decades, and are expected to appeal the ruling. Advocates blame the stores for the reservation's high rates of fetal alcoholism and poverty. The Oglala Lakota Tribe bans alcohol on the reservation, but the rules are frequently violated.
  • Flurry of Activity from Legislature on Day 70 of 80-day Session
     BISMARCK, ND - (KSJB/KSJZ) - North Dakota lawmakers missed their self-imposed goal of ending the current session in 70 days.  With 10 days of work still allowed under the state constitution, they can spread the work out by not gaveling into session and meeting in conference committees...
  • Jamestown Kiwanis Pancake Day Set for May 1
     JAMESTOWN (Katie Ryan-Anderson) - Serving the children of the community and the world -- that's the goal at Jamestown Kiwanis.  To do that, the annual Jamestown Kiwanis Pancake Day is set for 11 a.m. to 7 p.m...
  • Fatal Truck/Train Crash Early Monday in Rugby
     RUGBY, ND - A fatal crash early Monday has killed a 41-year-old Rugby, ND man.North Dakota Highway Patrol Sargent Joe Knowski reports the man was stopped as if waiting for the train on the south side of the tracks on Main Street in Rugby at 12:16 a.m...
  • Light Upgrades Scheduled Along Interstate at Jamestown and Elsewhere
     BISMARCK, ND (Jamie Olson) - Lighting upgrades along I-94 and I-29 in the urban areas of Fargo, Valley City, Jamestown, Grand Forks and Grand Forks Air Base will take place this spring and summer. The upgrades include new LED light fixtures, replacement of poles and general updates to the electrical lighting system in these areas...
  • Health Department Warns of Hantavirus Exposure
    BISMARCK, N.D. (Alysia Huck) – The North Dakota Department of Health (NDDoH) reminds everyone of the importance of protection against hantavirus disease. As spring begins, many people will be cleaning cabins and other buildings that have been closed for the winter. These are places where one is more likely to be exposed to the virus. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a viral infection that causes severe lung disease. Infected rodents spread the virus in their urine, droppings and saliva. The virus is transmitted when an individual breathes in air contaminated by the virus, and on rare occasions, it can be transmitted through an infected rodent bite. The deer mouse is the primary carrier of the virus. “People are most often exposed to hantavirus when cleaning or occupying previously vacant cabins, sheds or other dwellings and outbuildings that contain rodents, rodent droppings and rodent nests,” said Jill Baber, epidemiologist with the NDDoH Division of Disease Control. “There is no treatment for hantavirus disease, except for supportive care, so it is important to clean up rodent infestations properly to prevent infection.” NDDoH offers the following tips for cleaning a building with signs of rodent infestation to avoid hantavirus infection:  Ventilate the space by opening the doors and windows for 30 minutes before you start cleaning  Wear gloves and use disinfectant when cleaning up dead rodents or their urine, droppings and nests  Saturate the material with disinfectant for five minutes before removal  Mop floors and clean countertops, cabinets and drawers with disinfectant  Use a commercial EPA registered disinfectant following the label instructions or a bleach solution made with one part bleach and nine parts water  Do not stir up dust by sweeping or vacuuming up droppings, urine or nesting materials  Do not let children play in crawl spaces or vacant buildings where rodents may be present Symptoms of HPS usually begin two to three weeks after infection. Early symptoms commonly include fever, muscle and body aches, fatigue, headache, dizziness, chills, nausea and vomiting. Within a short period of time symptoms will worsen to include coughing and shortness of breath as lungs fill with fluid. People with HPS are typically hospitalized. Fifteen cases of HPS have been reported to the NDDoH since 1993, when the virus was first recognized in the United States. Seven of the 15 reported cases were fatal. Nationally, 690 cases have been reported with 36 percent resulting in death through Jan. 6, 2016. More than 96 percent of the reported cases have occurred in states west of the Mississippi River. 
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